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1033 entries.
Rev. Kit Flores-Madison Rev. Kit Flores-Madison from Gunnison, CO USA wrote on October 8, 2023 at 2:56 am
My deepest sympathies for Roger's family during this time. I have deeply enjoyed Roger's music my entire life, he will be greatly missed. The grace and peace of our Lord be with his family and friends. All my best, Kit
Wayne McNeill Wayne McNeill from Vancouver BC wrote on October 8, 2023 at 1:43 am
I grew up in a military family and lived in Germany growing up. One of my mothers favorite albums was Roger Whittaker Live in Canada. I listen on occasion and the memories of that part of my childhood come flooding back.
Benjamin Benjamin from North Manchester, IN, US wrote on October 7, 2023 at 11:54 pm
So sorry to hear of Roger’s passing. One of my mother’s favorite artists, I have many fond memories of Roger singing on the car radio while we drive. A beautiful voice and a wonderful human being. May the peace of God be with his family right now.
Ian stratton Ian stratton from Croydon Uk wrote on October 7, 2023 at 2:41 pm
Been brought up with listening to Roger we loved his songs and voice. My uncle became ill and moved in with me, he heard me playing roger on Alexia, being in his 80’s I would come home and it’s playing at full volume, he loved it. When he passed over we played rogers song’s especially for I loved you. Roger had a song for all occasions, I had privilege to hearing his concert in Fairfield Halls Croydon. God bless him and rest in peace his songs will never be forgotten and he will be played when it’s time for me to leave xx
Bonnie Fowler Bonnie Fowler from Mt Dora wrote on October 7, 2023 at 1:58 pm
Such a beautiful singer and wonderful soul.He will be missed greatly and I am so very glad we have his legacy of wonderful music to listen to and remember.God bless his family and good speed sir❤️
Peter Winniczuk Peter Winniczuk from La Fayette,NY wrote on October 6, 2023 at 7:32 pm
Sorry to hear of your passing. I wish I could have met you in person to thank you for all the joy & happiness you brought to my life with your beautiful voice & songs & whistling. My heart & prayers to your family and friends. Thank you.
Etienne Blaakman Etienne Blaakman from Livonia, NY wrote on October 6, 2023 at 12:48 pm
Wow, it’s October 6th and I was just going to write him a thank you note for all the joy he has brought into our lives over the years and send it to him in FB. Hard to believe he is gone. Love his music and voice. God bless you Mr. Whittaker, rest well, in my thoughts and prayers for your family.
Tim Tim from Missouri wrote on October 6, 2023 at 12:25 am
We listened to his Christmas album as a kid. We still do as a family. He will be missed but his music and legacy will live on. God’s grace’s to you all.
DB DB from Harwich wrote on October 5, 2023 at 3:45 pm
Brilliant! Just Brilliant, What a voice! Rest and Awake soon
Stephen Poulter Stephen Poulter from Basingstoke, UK wrote on October 4, 2023 at 3:21 pm
Hi yer. My mum loves Rogers music. Im more of a genesis man myself . But we were both very sad to heer he had died. Please tell me, why did the letters stop? We hav been waiting for years to find out what hsppened to Boris. I love old dogs!
George George from Bethlehem wrote on October 4, 2023 at 3:21 pm
A piece of my childhood is gone with Roger’s passing. My father must of play “all my best” on 8 track until the cartridge would overheat! All the lyrics, melodies and of course his whistling, will forever be in my memories. Rest in peace and god bless
Monique Bean Monique Bean from Amsterdam/ Vancouver wrote on October 3, 2023 at 10:06 pm
I’m so sad right now. I met Roger about 5 times from the late 70’s and on. Every time we moved to another city, he’d give a concert there and this became our little joke. I was pregnant twice and he remembered everything about me which I was very impressed with. I loved him when I was a teenager in the 70’s in Vancouver which was a strange genre for a teenager when disco had taken over. I was real upset when he shaved off his beard the first time and I told him so. I still listen to my own playlists daily and Roger is a big part of that. My love goes out to his family and all the millions of fans who took his music and made it their own. He had a long and happy life with accomplishments unlike others. I shall miss you, Roger! But will see you again when you play my welcome home concert. I first adored you as a 17 year old and now @64 I feel exactly the same way as then. RIP my friend, I’m gonna miss you 😢 Monique Bean …….so glad I have dozens of photos of us at various ages, they’re special memories.
Christina Sommer Christina Sommer from Lübbecke, Deutschland wrote on October 3, 2023 at 8:53 pm
Es ist sehr traurig,das uns Roger Whittaker nun für immer verlassen hat.Er war ein großartiger Sänger und Mensch.lch mochte seine Musik schon von klein auf.Meine Mutter hat viel Schallplatten gehabt von ihm und CDs.Ihr Lieblingslied war Abschied ist ein scharfes Schwert.lch bin immer noch ein Fan und werde es bleiben,auch wenn er nicht mehr da ist. In seinen Liedern lebt Roger weiter.. Mein Aufrichtiges Beileid und viel Kraft in dieser schweren Zeit wünsche ich den Angehörigen 🙏🖤🥀
Radford Jones Radford Jones from Oakland, MI wrote on October 3, 2023 at 8:36 pm
So sad to learn of Roger's passing. I am 84 and first heard him in 1963 during my US Air Force pilots training. I was a fan every since and saw him perform during visits to the USA. His music holds so many memories and his songs will never fade away.
James Shepard James Shepard from Temecula wrote on October 2, 2023 at 10:41 pm
So sad...his music has inspired me and other musicians for many years. What a great man and voice. We will all miss you Roger! Go with God and sing with the Angels.....
Jeffery Burrell Jeffery Burrell from Atlanta, GA USA wrote on October 1, 2023 at 9:16 pm
Roger Whittaker's music was always present in our home when I was growing up. He was one of my parent's favorite artists and his albums were in regular rotation. I've continued to listen to them through the years as a means of looking back and remembering so many great memories. His Christmas album has been a center of our holiday listening and will take on a different note this holiday season. Peace and prayers to Roger's family and fans around the world.
Kenneth Thomas Kenneth Thomas from Neath,Port Talbot wrote on October 1, 2023 at 1:26 pm
Had the great pleasure of meeting Roger in person. It was back in 1981in Sears department store in Saskatoon Saskatchewan Canada,he was signing autographs,he signed a album of his hits which I bought at the store, which I still own.l also took a photo of him which I still have. I bought a ticket to the show he was doing in the Saskatoon Centennial auditorium (good show) We had a short chat,he used to fly is own aircraft,he was a nice man who always made time for his fans. RIP Roger Whittaker,it was nice to meet you all those years ago.
Phil Hayward Phil Hayward from Castellon wrote on October 1, 2023 at 9:18 am
I was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip HaywardI was saddened to read of the death of Roger Whittaker. We were friends throughout our time from 11 to 17 at school in Nairobi, and in the last two years occupied facing beds in senior dorm. I remember him as noisy, singing, and in the last year devoting himself to making a guitar from materials he collected and formed. I don't recall him ever playing it. He claimed, rightly, that I was tone deaf. On one of our later meetings we agreed that the school failed us – he was never in the school choir and I never gained entrance to the workshop. I think disciplined choral singing was not his style! Although his father was nearby – he was Slater and Whittaker at Kabete, a few miles away – Roger was a boarder by his father's preference. My home then was in Tanganyika, three days away, although later my father also lived in Nairobi. Whittaker and I spent our last evening in Kenya together in the nightclub of the Norfolk Hotel, invited by my father; an empty occasion for two innocent schoolboys unused to drinking, and no knowing what to expect. In the morning flew together in a BOAC Argonaut to Heathrow, where after a long flight in adjacent seats we were happy to go our separate ways As his singing career developed, we met and shared many memories. He never accepted that I taught him the trick that became Mexican Whistler. He was dismissive, and did not care to be told, of Durham's distance from the Tyne. We met in Southport and toured awhile in his old Rolls Royce as he began to enjoy the fruits of success. He told me of his daily income from “airplays”, already enviable. We met in Preston and again in Stockton on Tees, as my work and his tours coincided. By then he was protected, and I saw how he was mobbed but unmoved by the young girls offering everything after the show. Touring in his early days he said he was tested by a Norwegen group who placed a beautiful girl to await him in his bed, but he stayed away from the excesses of touring and told me he turned down pressure from Mic Jagger to take drugs to improve his sex life. There was tragedy as well as success in his life. His Father was murdered during a robbery in his home in Kenya and he was worried but close about his sister's troubled life. I wish his family comfort. Philip Hayward
Gun-Britt Andersson Gun-Britt Andersson from Sandared wrote on September 30, 2023 at 9:17 pm
Med sorg i hjärtat hörde jag att min favoritartist somnat in. När jag behövde finna lugn o ro i min själ, ja då lyssnade jag på Roger Whittaker. Hans röst o musik och underbara låtar fick mig att slappna av..Sov I ro...❤🙏❤
Amy Amy from Milwaukee wrote on September 30, 2023 at 4:33 pm
My dad listened to Roger Whittaker often when I was growing up and I fell in love with his voice, stories and mesmerizing talent. I had a double album live concert on vinyl that was in 4 parts and I listened to it almost daily. I Don't Believe in If Anymore, The First Hello, the Last Goodbye, Durham Town, New World in the Morning - so many wonderful songs that I still sing all the time. He also taught me to whistle much better. I would whistle along to Mexican Whistler and still whistle it randomly. He brought such comfort after my dad passed as well. I am forever grateful to Roger for sharing such a beautiful gift of song throughout my life and years to come. Sadness fills me because my dear, sweet soul, this is our Last Farewell. Much love to his family and extended "fan family".